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Cia Runesson

14 Billion Years of Theatrical Physics!

There is a storm coming.
Be there!
The night club is in your head.

"Today I shall talk about a very small part of physic history that has
literally changed the world and our concept of the universe.
I shall choose some points that have changed the physics and our way of thinking.
Three breakthroughs in human thought."

It's about gravity, predictions, scale and expansion.
For some time now, I have considered the concept of theatrical physics.
What might this be?
I know physical theatre, because this was my training,
but what is theatrical physics?
What might it be?

I'm not sure I'm getting any closer with this "performance", this little slice of the cake that we (at the Academy of Music and Performing Arts) call "the practical presentation" but nevertheless , it's an attempt. It's the first attempt.

It's a call out!
The performance is approximately 60 minutes and consists of three parts:
A sound, a text and a tune.

The performance likes to connect to the tradition of ”memory theatres”, the 14th century idea of using the theatre format as a vehicle for knowledge.
The performance also likes to act in the realms beyond the concepts of good and bad.
The text in the performance is based on a conversation with Alexis, the greek mathematician, on a Sunday afternoon in Athens, Greece.

Starring: Per-Olof Nilsson, Tim Greenlee and Cecilia Runesson
Sound: Tommy Karlsson
Sound design for the storm: Emilie Odelberg
Light: Daniel Björnarås

Cia Runeson

Trained at Nordic Theatre School, Århus, Denmark. Co-founder and member of the group Force Majeure, making performances and installations in a wide range of contexts in Scandinavia and beyond. Sometimes a curator in the visual art field.

Page Manager: Tobias Egle|Last update: 2/8/2016
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